Rising Fountains Development Prog Weblog

February 16, 2008

Flooding Update

Filed under: Africa, AIDS, Volunteers, Zambia — rfdp @ 8:41 am

It’s Jeannie here again this week with an update on the flooding in RFDP’s catchment area. 

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Following the report we received on January 30th from three community leaders from Chief Kazembe on flooding in the area, the organization immediately started to organize a trip to Kazembe to qualify and quantify the report.  As we don’t have our own vehicle, it took almost a week to organize for transport and set other logistics in place.  On Friday February 8th, the team set off to Kazembe, along with Mr. Soko, Lundazi District Commissioner, and Mr. Kamunga, a member of Lundazi District Disaster Management and Mitigation Committee.  On all our projects RFDP works along side the local government authorities in supporting and supplementing their work. 

 

Two rivers flow through Chief Kazembe – the Lundazi and Lumezi.  The first stop for the team was at the confluence of these two rivers.  We were walking through fields of maize, making our way towards the river bed, when we had to stop just as we started to walk through tall grass.  The water level had increased that day and we were unable to assess the true extent of damage caused to crops and property along this stretch of the river.

 

The next stop was at Chipangula Village about the Lundazi River.  We did not have to walk far into the fields before we realized the damaged caused to the crops by flash flooding.  Maize crops had been destroyed by water, while closer to the river bed, sand had been washed up by the water and maize buried.  As the water levels continue to rise, nearby villages are also at risk.

 

We also visited Kafunthamula Village, along the Lumezi River.  Here, the river had changed its course causing more crops to be destroyed.  Moreover, at a nearby village a house had collapsed due to heavy rains and chickens and food had been destroyed.  Communities on the other side of the river are cut off from the services on the side we were on – schools and the health centre.  A teacher at Kazembe Basic School reported a fall in attendance since the beginning of the floods, with eight of the newly enrolled Grade One pupils not being able to attend, while Grade Seven pupils swim across – far from an ideal start to the day for school children. 

 

Meanwhile at Kambwili Community School, the Head Teacher told me that more than half of his pupils were stranded on the other side of the Lumezi, resulting in the community establishing a temporary community school.  Yet the quality of education being received was affected by little supplies – chalk, exercise books and pencils.  At Kazembe Rural Health Centre, the Outdoor Officer said that people on the other side of the Lumezi could not cross to receive medical treatment.  The Clinic was expecting to receive an increase in the number of patients suffering from malaria and diarrhea diseases as a result of the flooding but that there were no mosquito nets (crucial to malaria prevention) left.

 

At a community meeting, a number of pit-latrines were reported to have collapsed due to heavy rainfall.  This means that people now have to go in the bush.  The impact of this is that water sources are at risk from being contaminated, contributing to an increase in diarrhea diseases.  The one issue that dominated the meeting was that of hunger.  Although, the crops that have been destroyed will have an heavy impact on food security in the coming months, hunger already existed because of flooding last year and a pest called Larger Green Borer, which destroys crops which are ready to be harvested, or have been harvested and are in storage.  At the meeting it became clear that most households are surviving on just pumpkins leaves at this time. 

 

Although this paints a grave picture at the moment, the factor that is even more concerning is that the really heavy rains are not forecast until late February / early March, when this situation will get worse.  Moreover, we were not able to across the rivers to assess the situation in other areas which are reported to be suffering from an even greater impact from the floods.  While in Kazembe, we heard reports that Chiweza Middle Basic School had been flooded and books destroyed.  This added to the information in the previous report is off great concern.    

 

Much more data is needed to truly assess the impact of these initial flash floods and to coordinate an effective relief effort among all the different stakeholders.  The information that RFDP compiled in Kazembe has been laid out in a Needs Assessment and has been submitted to different bodies, in the hope that relief can be sought in the short term and more effective disaster management can be administrated in the long term.                           

February 2, 2008

Natural Disaster in Kazembe

Filed under: Africa, AIDS, Volunteers, Zambia — rfdp @ 9:05 am

January 26th – February 1st

 

This week our third international volunteer, Anna from Australia, finally arrived.  As there are three of us now, only two computers, problems with the internet and our work load in general, we’ve decided to take it week about writing the blog.  This is Jeannie this week. 

 

 

One thing has dominated our work this week – flooding in the Valley.  After knowing that it was inevitable for some time, reports reached us on Wednesday of what was happening.

 

Three gentlemen from Kazembe came to the office on Wednesday to give the report.   They were Mr. Zozi (Chairperson of Kazembe Disaster Management Committee), Mr. Gilbert (Kazembe Ward Counselor) and Mr. Ng’uni (PTA Chairperson for Kambwili Community School).  Mr Gilbert narrated the following report:

 

Flooding started on the 26th of January at approximately 03:00 hours.  The three key area affected in Chief Kazembe were Kazembe Central, Chiweza and Zokwe. 

 

In Kazembe Central the total population affected is estimated to be 600-700 people.  Five villages are submerged in water, fifteen houses have collapsed and 60-70 fields have been submerged in water.  Crops in these fields included maize, banana, rice and cotton – all have been lost.  The RFDP headquarters in Kazembe has also been affected. 

 

In Chiweza the total population affected is 580.  Two villages have been submerged, along with Chiweza Middle Basic School.  Five houses have collapsed with a total value of 1.5m Zambian Kwacha (US$410).  The number of fields flooded is currently unknown but as in Kazembe they include maize, banana and rice crops.    

 In Zokwe the total population affected is 800.  In Zokwe three quarters of the land is flat resulting in all villages and fields on flat land being submerged in water.  All the maize crops are destroyed and the only crop people can depend on now is rice.   

On Friday, Mr. Phiri, Kazembe Rural Health Centre Clinical Officer visited RFDP’s office and informed us that the situation was continuing to get worse.  Villages in Kazembe Central and Chiweza have now been displaced, with people being forced to make shelter from what every material they can find – roofs are normally made from grass thatch but dry grass is impossible to find. 

 

Before flooding people were already starving as there was no crop surplus as a result of the floods last year.  With the loss of crops, this situation will continue for some time.  In Chiweza, a store holding some maize for relief was flooded and the contents destroyed.  The maize in the store in Kazembe is no where near enough to meet the demand.  Moreover, this maize is for sale – but people have no money to buy it. 

 

We are still waiting for reports to come in for Chief Chitungulu and Mwanya on events there but the picture emerging from Chief Kazembe is expected to be typical of what is happening in the other areas of our catchment area.  Moreover, the heavy rains are just starting – they will get much worse as February progresses meaning this situation will get much worse and the number of people affected will rapidly increase.  There have already been reports of two deaths in Chama District, which borders Chief Kazembe – one of them a Grade One child. 

 

In all areas there is now an increased risk of cholera, diarrhea and other water borne diseases.  There is also an increased risk of malaria, especially for those who have lost their households.   School and health clinics in the villages are also in water, which means pupils cannot attend school and people have no access to medicine.

 

We are planning a trip to Kazembe on Monday to carry out a detailed needs assessment of the immediate needs of the villages affected.  Based on this information we received during the week we expect them to be: 

  • Food Aid (Maize, oil, beans, salt)
  • Chlorine for water purification
  • Medicine
  • Shelter (tents) for those who have lost their houses
  • Mosquito nets
  • Temporary Community Schools: books & shelter

 

It is estimated that more than 2000 households will be affected from now until March/end of rainy season.  RFDP is work along side the local government authorizes to ensure measures are taken to support all the households/villages affected by this natural disaster.  In the following week, hopefully a more detailed picture will emerge from across the catchment area and effective relief work will begin. 

        

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