Rising Fountains Development Prog Weblog

March 29, 2008

Jeannie’s Blog – The Forgotten Floods

Filed under: Africa, AIDS, Volunteers, Zambia — rfdp @ 9:37 am

March 2008

Over the last few weeks we’ve been really bad at keeping this blog up to date.  I’ve long accepted that there’s no such thing as an average day here so as you can imagine it’s difficult to know where to begin in updating you all on what we’ve been up too.

As the two previous blog’s centred on the flooding in Kazembe, its best to start by bringing you up to date on that.  After collecting all the data and writing the needs assessment on both the immediate and long term needs of the affected communities we submitted it to international donors.  Unfortunately, we are still waiting on fed back.  We also haven’t heard any reports of relief being administrated by other stakeholders so the people of the Valley have just had to cope with the flooding, just as they have had to in previous years.  Government relief and Aid Agencies are giving priority to Southern Province where a greater number of communities have been more heavily affected. 

While the water may have receded from the fields and villages, communities still, and will continue to feel, the impact of the floods for some time.  Crops have been destroyed so while households may have some food from remaining crops or the support of extended families after harvest in April/May, by the time the ‘hunger period’ comes back in December, these are the households which will be affected worse.  For the households whose homes have collapsed, they now face the task of rebuilding their homes, not knowing if they will have to do the same thing next year.  Many pit-latrines (toilets) have also collapsed resulting in many households and communities being without proper sanitation installations so they have to use the bush.  If there is an overflow of affluent from the collapsed pit-latrines this can lead to water contamination and obvious hygiene risks.  RFDP will continue to seek funding to help these communities and work along side them to recover from these floods and seek alternatives to help limit their impact in the future.  For me, the hardest thing to accept is that we went and saw the devastation but still couldn’t help, at least in the short term.  Despite the frustration at that, it just makes you all the more determined to continue to work with these communities and help them find sustainable, long term solutions to their problems.

Back in the BOMA there has been little rain, despite the floods in the Valley.  I don’t think the maize that was planted in our garden will be good.  It’s become a discoloured yellow, as if it is becoming withered.  I think the major problem is that it was planted too late and missed the rains in late January, early February.  It’s OK for mazungo’s though – of course we’ll be fine whether the maize is OK or not.  It’s the families who depend on their crops for their family’s survival who will not.

The other major thing which happened in the last few weeks was Josée’s departure.  She left on Tuesday after working at RFDP for three months.  She’s left a big gap in RFDP – and in our house as well.  We’re all missing her a lot!!!  On her last week in Lundazi, Josée’s facilitated a workshop for RFDP staff and Community Outreach Workers on project management.  We all learnt a lot during it – on the development of projects, report writing and proposal writing to mention just a few things.  So now it’s our turn to implement the things we learnt which will help RFDP develop and grow. 

Aside from learning at the workshop, it was also a great opportunity to spend time with the Community Outreach Workers.  When we go to the Valley we normally only get to spend a few days with them individually.  Living and working in the field they are the back bone of the organisation and are fundamental to the daily running of projects and collection of data.  During the workshop we got to get to know them as a group and thank them for all their hard work and commitment to RFDP. 

When Josée’s travelled to Lusaka last weekend, Anna and I accompanied her as we had some meetings with donors after the Easter Break.  As usual our journey to Lusaka was another African adventure – over sixteen hours this time.  The road between Chipata and Lundazi has continued to deteriorate with the rain.  There are many pot-holes and the bus has to drive on the side of the road to avoid them.  About eighteen months ago the journey took around two hours.  Last Saturday it took us four and a half hours!!!  Apparently the government has set aside money for the improvement of the road.  Work is supposed to start shortly which is crucial for the development of Lundazi – both the BOMA and the Valley area.     

It was strange being in Lusaka – a city with lots of people… and vehicles!!!! We visited Manda Hill Shopping Arcade and it really was like stepping back into Europe for the day, with more mazungos than Zambians.  It was a culture shock going back to that, a complete world away from Lundazi, even the real Lusaka for that matter.  While we were there, we had few reminders that we were in Africa.  We had no “how are you?” or few truly friendly faces welcoming us as we have grown accustomed to in Lundazi.  Equally, the street children are kept away by security guards so the affluent can shop without reminders that the amount they spend in one shopping trip, most people don’t earn in life time here.      

After our meetings, which were very interesting and productive, I was glad to get back to Lundazi last night.  I’ve just over two weeks left here and want to get a lot of work before I leave.  I can’t even begin to think what home will be like or how I’ll adjust back to life there.  One thing is for sure, part of Zambia will always stay with me no matter where I go.    

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1 Comment »

  1. Hello Jeannie,

    It was nice to read your blog. So strange to be on the other side of the world now and not with you at the office working hard. I miss it very much!

    Josee

    Comment by Josee-Anne — April 4, 2008 @ 2:51 am


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